Limitless Cinema in Broken English

May 31, 2007

RUIZ, GREENAWAY, ROBBE-GRILLET TOOK THE DICE

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 10:26 am

This is my comment in MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE’s blog:
http://memoriesofthefuture.wordpress.com/2007/05/25/my-world-this-last-month/

Thanks to your suggestions about Regina Spektor and Summer in the City, I have listened to the album BEGIN TO HOPE (2006), and like the songs ON THE RADIO and APRES MOI very much. I think ON THE RADIO is very catchy, and I like her voice in APRES MOI.

Seeing Ruiz and Greenaway films together is one thing I would like to do, too. In my opinion, Ruiz, Greenaway, and Robbe-Grillet films can be grouped together in a way, because they are:

1.Like a kind of games, or mind games.

1.1 SNAKES AND LADDERS (1980, Raoul Ruiz)
Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote in http://www.rouge.com.au/ that this film is “a Borgesian metaphysical fantasy whose hero progressively discovers that France is a life-size board game (devoted to Snakes and Ladders or ‘The Goose’s Game’) – one has to deal with tatty special effects of Edward D. Wood Jr calibre, along with the brilliant conceits and two separate off-screen narrators, male and female.”

Note: While France becomes a board game in SNAKES AND LADDERS, the map of Paris is also represented like a board game in LE PONT DU NORD (1982, Jacques Rivette).

1.2 DROWNING BY NUMBERS (1988, Peter Greenaway)

1.3 N TOOK THE DICE (1971, Alain Robbe-Grillet)
I have heard that this film is made by breaking up EDEN AND AFTER into various fragments, and put the fragments together again in a new order of scenes. The scene order of this film is determined by the dice throwing of a new narrator.

If you like films in this group, two other films I recommend are LES CREATURES (1966, Agnes Varda, A+), in which islanders are turned into pawns in a chess game, and YOU BET YOUR LIFE (2005, Antonin Svoboda, Austria, A+), in which the act of dice throwing seems to determine a man’s fate.

2.Deeply influenced by paintings.
Magritte seems to influence both Ruiz and Robbe-Grillet.

3.Deeply influenced by literature.
For example:

3.1 LA BELLE CAPTIVE has a character who said he met Marcel Proust last night in a theatre.

4.Narratively puzzling

5.Present characters as if they are objects, or pawns in games. Somehow, they seem to be the opposite of films by John Cassavetes, Eric Rohmer, or Caveh Zahedi, because the latter group excels in presenting characters as real human beings. I think both groups are great in their own ways. I have heard that Walerian Borowczyk also tends to present characters as if they are objects, too.

I haven’t seen HYPOTHESES OF A STOLEN PAINTING. I have seen only four films by Ruiz so far. They are A PLACE AMONG THE LIVING, THAT DAY, TIME REGAINED, and SHATTERED IMAGE. I think I like THAT DAY the most. TIME REGAINED might be the best, but I feel closer to THAT DAY.

I haven’t read EMMA, but I had to read PRIDE AND PREJUDICE in 1994, when I took 19th Century British Novels course. I had to read PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, GREAT EXPECTATIONS, VANITY FAIR and TESS OF D’URBERVILLES in the course at that time. I have to admit that I like PRIDE AND PREJUDICE the least, but I like watching films adapted from Austen from time to time. I haven’t seen PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (2005, Joe Wright), though. I like EMMA (1996, Douglas McGrath, A-), but I prefer CLUELESS (1995, Amy Heckerling, A+), which is also adapted from Austen’s EMMA.


 

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V. FUNGI MY ENEMY

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 9:10 am

COPY FROM AN E-MAIL I SENT TO SOMEONE

As for my life, I hope it rains a lot this year. This is the first year in my life that I like rain. I have hated rain all over my life. It makes traveling difficult and it causes flood. But this year’s summer (starting in March in Thailand) is very hot, and the rain has helped a lot in cooling down temperature. I also fear the global warming very much. I fear that there will be severe drought. So the rain will help cooling down my fear, too.

Today I feel a little bit sad, because I have just discovered that many videotapes I haven’t watched have been destroyed by fungus. Oh! I wish I hadn’t spent that much money on videotapes. It’s my stupidity. I should have resisted the temptation to buy videotapes in 1990’s.

Videotapes I have just thrown away without ever watching them:

1.AN AFFAIR OF LOVE (1999, Frederic Fonteyne)
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WKEGW1ZEL._SS500_.jpg

2.THE LIFESTYLE: SWINGING IN AMERICA (1999, David Schisgall)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196699/

3.THE KID STAYS IN THE PICTURE (2002, Nanette Burstein + Brett Morgen)

I also have to have my video player repaired. I hope there are some service shops that can still repair video player.

I think I will slowly check other videotapes to see if there are some to be thrown away. I will try to limit throwing not more than one videotape per week. I would not have been sad like this if I have watched them. Now I know I’m the real victim of consumerism. I just kept on buying things I don’t use and will never have a chance to use.

My most favorite film recently is BOYHOOD LOVES (AMOUR D’ENFANCE) (2001, Yves Caumon, A+). I don’t know how to describe the good things about this film. Each scene is so simple but it hits exactly right. It balances everything very well. The mood in some scene is serious, but not as manipulative as many other films. The editing is great. One scene I like very much is the scene when the hero comes back home and is standing behind his mother, looking at her. He keeps on looking and we see the minute details of the expressions on his face. And then the film cuts suddenly to another scene, and we have to imagine by ourselves how our hero greets his mother or what he talks to her when they meet for the first time in a long while. Most films would show the conversation between the hero and his mother, but this film just show what comes before that.

A great review for BOYHOOD LOVES:
http://www.eyeforfilm.co.uk/reviews.php?film_id=8887

ROBBE-GRILLET IN LITERATURE/FILM QUARTERLY

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 7:43 am

COPY FROM AN E-MAIL I SENT TO SOMEONE

Fortunately, I have successfully contacted my friend, and he told me that the Robbe-Grillet articles are from LITERATURE/FILM QUARTERLY magazines. So maybe you can go to a library to look for the magazines, or you can buy them from its website:
http://www.salisbury.edu/lfq/

Information about the magazine’s back issues with Robbe-Grillet articles:
http://www.salisbury.edu/lfq/backissues.htm

VOL.17 (1989)
NO.2
ROBBE-GRILLET INTERVIEW WITH ROYAL S. BROWN
This article contains very useful information about LA BELLE CAPTIVE, and Robbe-Grillet comments on Godard, Lelouch, and Beineix

VOL.18 (1990)
NO.4
SERIALISM IN ROBBE-GRILLET
This article analyzes EDEN AND AFTER.

VOL.23 (1995)
NO.1
OPEN NARRATIVES IN ROBBE-GRILLET AND WENDERS
(I don’t have this article)

You can order the magazine’s back issues from:
http://www.salisbury.edu/lfq/orderform.htm

For Bangkokians, You can find LITERATURE/FILM QUARTERLY in the Chulalongkorn Main library. You can look for both the current issues and the older ones on the same floor that carry magazines and periodicals. Many great articles concerned mostly about the issue of adaptation and the influences between film and literary world.

The map to Chulalongkorn Main Library:
http://www.car.chula.ac.th/art/contact/index.html

This is a photo from EDEN AND AFTER (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet, A+), provided by Sonthaya Subyen:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/200/522367909_aefa089b15_o.jpg

The scene above is influenced by some paintings by Piet Mondrian. This is COMPOSITION WITH RED, YELLOW AND BLUE (1921) by Piet Mondrian:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/251/522367911_7f4bdbdae4_o.jpg

The painting by Piet Mondrian reminds me of some paintings shown at VER GALLERY in Bangkok in the exhibition DON’T BE HAPPY. DO BE WORRIED by M.I.T.-S.I.X. (Mythicize Inconvenience Truth – Social Instrumental X). These are two photos of the paintings shown in this exhibition:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/254/522367917_4ed93a5188_o.jpg
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/233/522367919_6105598d6d_o.jpg

For more information about DON’T BE HAPPY. DO BE WORRIED, please read:
http://www.verver.info/gallery.html

May 28, 2007

CONFUSING JAPANESE NAME LIST

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 5:06 pm

Sometimes I find it hard to remember some Japanese names,  so I think I should make a list about it.

*

MY CONFUSING JAPANESE DIRECTOR NAME LIST

1.KATSUHITO ISHII
SHARK SKIN MAN AND PEACH HIP GIRL (1998, B+)

2.KATSUYUKI MOTOHIRO
UDON (2006, B+)

3.KAZUAKI KIRIYA
CASSHERN (2004, A-)

4.KAZUO KUROKI
THE FACE OF JIZO (2004, A+)

5.KAZUSHI WATANABE
19 (2000, A-)

6.KAZUYOSHI KUMAKIRI
HOLE IN THE SKY (2001, A)

7.KICHITARO NEGISHI
WHAT THE SNOW BRINGS (2005, A-)

8.MASAHIKO NAKASAWA
NIGHT TIME PICNIC (2006, A+)

9.MASAHIRO KOBAYASHI
BASHING (2005, A+)

10.MITSUHIRO MIHARA
VILLAGE ALBUM (2004, A/A-)

11.MOTOHASHI SEIICHI
ALEXEI AND THE SPRING (2002, A+)

12.NOBUHIKO OBAYASHI
HOUSE (1977, A+)

13.NOBUHIRO YAMASHITA
NO ONE’S ARK (2003, A+)

14.NORIAKI TSUCHIMOTO
MINAMATA: THE VICTIMS AND THEIR WORLD (1972, A+)

THIS IS A POSTER OF LES AMBITIEUX (2007, Catherine Corsini), STARRING ERIC CARAVACA, WHO WILL HAVE ONE OF HIS FILMS, “THE PASSENGER” (2006), SHOWN IN BANGKOK IN JUNE.
 

KEEP TALKING ABOUT BALTHAZAR AND DURAS

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 6:12 am

About my earlier post on “THE LADY VANISHES FROM ARTHOUSE CINEMA”

http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/05/lady-vanishes-from-arthouse-cinema.html

Here is a comment from my friend SCOTT MAZAK, on the situation:

“It’s not the dvd or computer screen – those are symptoms. I’m afraid it is global. and the reason is globalization. the consciousness of humans has been colonized and is currently being programmed to facilitate mass production, marketing, distribution and of course consumption. the system needs simplicity, efficiency, regimentation and total control to streamline profits and slavery. art can only exist as a shiny packaged product – if not, it must be eradicated. It is the duty of anyone who thinks this or sees it to do something, whether large or small, to derail the process. Keep talking about Balthazar and Duras as loudly and eloquently as you can. Unfettered creativity is all humanity has in the end. Serve it or we die.”

REPLY TO JESSE, AND COMMENT ON WAKING LIFE

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 1:02 am

MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE made a comment in my blog here:
https://celinejulie.wordpress.com/2007/05/25/alain-robbe-grillet-interviewed-by-tom-bishop/

This is Celinejulie’s reply:

I also have more books than I can read. I have bought some novels by Duras and Robbe-Grillet, but still haven’t find time to read them yet.

Coincidentally, I saw WAKING LIFE after LA BELLE CAPTIVE, and found that these two films are both about dreams within dreams. However, I think these two films are very different, because WAKING LIFE seems to appeal to “intellect”, while LA BELLE CAPTIVE, similar to other Robbe-Grillet’s films, seems to appeal to “sense”.

I think WAKING LIFE is amazing. Though I watched it with Thai subtitles, I could follow only 10 % of the dialogues. I think I have to watch it again. The dialogues in this film are too difficult for my brain to follow in the first viewing, but I think this is a good thing. WAKING LIFE reminds me of something I feel when I watched some films by Jean-Luc Godard or Hans-Juergen Syberberg. These films are full of interesting information. If these films are webpages, they would be webpages containing 1000 hyperlinks in each of the page. Watching these films inspires one to go to a library afterwards to search for more information about what is referred to in the films.

For example, in the case of Jean-Luc Godard, the film which made me feel strongly about this is LA CHINOISE (1967, A+). There were some scenes in the film in which Jean-Pierre Leaud erased some famous names from a blackboard. I think I would like to pause at these scenes to write down all the names in the blackboard and search for some information about them.

In the case of Syberberg, one scene which inspired me to search for more information is a surreal scene in LUDWIG: REQUIEM FOR A VIRGIN KING (1972, A+), in which Wagner talked about many names, such as Niki de Saint Phalle and Werner Schroeter. I had never heard about Niki de Saint Phalle before, but I got to know her because of this film.

One scene that I like in WAKING LIFE is the silent moment when Caveh Zahedi stares at someone. I find it very touching when a film which is full of talking suddenly becomes silent. This great feeling reminds me of the stock market scene in THE ECLIPSE (Michelangelo Antonioni) when the noisy market suddenly becomes silent.

Below is a photo of NIKE (1984), a sculpture by Niki de Saint Phalle

REPLY TO GIRISH ABOUT DURAS

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 12:55 am

Girish Shambu wrote a comment on my blog here:
https://celinejulie.wordpress.com/2007/05/27/royal-s-brown-interviews-alain-robbe-grillet/

This is Celinejulie’s reply:

Thank you very much for the information about a book by Royal S. Brown.

I saw SLOW MOTION (1980, Jean-Luc Godard) about 8-9 years ago. I can’t remember the scene referring to Marguerite Duras, but what I like very much about this film is the funniest scene in which one character did a funny thing, and the second character would do a funny thing, and the third character would do a funny thing, and go on and on like this.

However, your mentioning of Duras reference in SLOW MOTION reminds me that I read something about this in FILM COMMENT a few years ago. So I searched and found that in FILM COMMENT, Jan-Feb 2002, Godard talked about this in an interview conducted by Jean-Yves Gaillac, Tissy Morgue & Jean-Philippe Guerand. The interview was translated by Alice Lovejoy:

“The interviewer: It reminds me of the scene in “Sauve qui peut (la vie)” when Dutronc announces to his students that Marguerite Duras is in the next room, but we never see her.

Godard: In fact, she really was there, but she did not want to be filmed—perhaps because of her taste for voiceover in her own films. She came in order to be offscreen [laughs].”

I have read from TIME OUT FILM GUIDE that another film which mentions Marguerite Duras is POLYESTER (1981, John Waters), in which there is a huge drive-in billboard saying “NOW SHOWING…THREE MARGUERITE DURAS HITS”, or something like that. I haven’t seen POLYESTER, but I have heard that John Waters like Duras’ films very much.

I think I’m a little bit obsessed with Duras and Robbe-Grillet. Hahaha. But I’m not obsessed enough to find the time to read their novels yet.

In my opinion, I think Duras and Robbe-Grillet represent something ironic in the film history. I think one thing filmmakers should do is to make films which can’t be described by words, films which cannot be replaced by novels. But the filmmakers who seem to achieve this, the filmmakers who seem to really understand the huge potential of cinema are, unexpectedly, the novelists—Duras and Robbe-Grillet.

Talking about writing and filming reminds of what Duras said in the book DURAS BY DURAS (published by City Lights Books, San Francisco, 1987). In an article THE PATH OF JOYFUL DESPAIR, which is an interview with Duras by Claire Devarrieux, Duras said:

“It is when a script is performed that we’re the furthest from the author. Even when I directed my own scripts, it happened to me—except in INDIA SONG. In INDIA SONG the actors proposed characters but didn’t embody them. “Off screen” is still the place of writing. Delphine Seyrig’s fantastic performance in INDIA SONG came about because she never presents herself as someone named Anne-Marie Stretter but as her far-off, contestable double, as if uninhabited, and as if she never regarded this role as an emptiness to be enacted; but on the contrary, as though her reference to the written Anne-Marie Stretter remained intact. As for my other films, some evenings after a shoot, I had the sense I had lost my text. I was in despair. Its undefined virtuality was destroyed, it left its written form to end up as a sort of definitive utterance. To be completely honest, I have always suffered from this transformation, this shattering of the text’s obscurities; it’s because of that I made LE CAMION.”

What I like very much in INDIA SONG is the voiceover in the film. In March, I also made a list of films with interesting use of voiceovers. I would like to post it again here:

http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/03/twisted-dimensions-of-narrativity.html

8.1 INDIA SONG (MARGUERITE DURAS, A+)

8.2 A WALK THROUGH H: THE REINCARNATION OF AN ORNITHOLOGIST (1978. PETER GREENAWAY, A+)

8.3 RUSSIAN ARK (ALEXANDER SOKUROV, A+)

8.4 OUD DEE (2003, SOMPOT CHIDGASORNPONGSE, A+)

8.5 A HALF LIFE OF CARBON 14 (2005, PUNLOP HORHARIN, A+)

8.6 NEWS FROM HOME (1977, CHANTAL AKERMAN, A+)http://www.filmref.com/directors/dirpages/akerman.html

8.7 A PLACE AMONG THE LIVING (2004, RAOUL RUIZ, A)

8.8 LONDON (1994, PATRICK KEILLER)
http://imdb.com/title/tt0110377/

8.9 SANS SOLEIL (1983, CHRIS MARKER)

Below is a photo of TAXANDRIA (1994, Raoul Servais), of which Alain Robbe-Grillet co-wrote the screenplay. The photo is from dvdbeaver.com

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDReview3/RaoulServais.htm

REPLY TO MUBARAK ABOUT ROBBE-GRILLET

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 12:48 am

MUBARAK ALI has commented in my blog here:
http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/05/royal-s-brown-interviews-alain-robbe.html

This is Celinejulie’s reply:

I didn’t notice in LA BELLE CAPTIVE if there is an object that finds itself used by the different characters. I think I have to watch this DVD again soon. One of the things that I like in this film is the “too many shoes”. It makes me laugh out loud when the third shoe appeared in the film. How could Robbe-Grillet get an idea like that?

I can’t find Royal S. Brown’s articles on the internet. However, if you or anybody else want to read these two articles, you can e-mail me at bearania@yahoo.com to give me your address, so that I can send the articles to you.

I tried to contact my friend who gave me these Royal S. Brown’s articles to ask where these articles came from, but I can’t reach him right now. However, on the Royal S. Brown article on Eden and After, I notice that my friend wrote “1990, Vol. 18, No.4” . So I guess this article might come from a magazine, but I don’t know which magazine. Royal S. Brown was identified as someone from Queens College (C.U.N.Y.) in the article.

In this article, Royal S. Brown also translated something from “L’Eden et apres: Genese d’un film” (transcript of a video-taped conversation between Francois Jost and Robbe-Grillet), which appeared in a booklet called “Alain Robbe-Grillet: Ouevres cinematographiques” (Paris: Ministere des Relations 1982). I think it is interesting, so I quote it here:

“Alain Robbe-Grillet has noted that the basic idea for l’Eden was to use as a narrative generator a form as hostile as possible to the very idea of a narrative. Now, the form that is the most hostile to the continuity, to the causality of the narrative is obviously the series. What characterizes the succession of events in a chronological narrative is the causal linking of events to each other through a kind of hierarchy. On the other hand, as in music, where the Schoenbergian series represents the suppression of the very idea of tonality, so that there is no longer any dominant, no longer any tonic, serialism in a narrative would be a completely equal treatment of a certain number of themes.”

Below is a photo from EDEN AND AFTER (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet, A+). Thanks to Sonthaya Subyen for the photo.

REPLY TO PETER ABOUT CLASSIC THAI DVDS

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 12:42 am

Since I find it difficult to make a link in the comment box, I tend to answer anyone who comments in my blog by writing a new post, so that I can make links easily. Sorry for any inconvenience.

PETER NELLHAUS has commented in my blog here:
http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/05/brian-darrs-homme-fatale-list.html

This is Celinejulie’s reply:

I think three of Rattana Pestonji’s films are available as DVDs with English subtitles. They are COUNTRY HOTEL (1957), DARK HEAVEN (1958), and FOREVER YOURS (1955, directed by “Marut” or Tawee na Bangchang, but cinematographed and produced by Pestonji).

Wise Kwai wrote about COUNTRY HOTEL here:
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=100000335&entryid=262601&view=public

Wise Kwai wrote about other Thai classic DVDs here:
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=100000335&entryid=421033&view=public

These classic Thai film DVDs are available from the Thai Film Foundation. The website of the Foundation is at http://www.thaifilm.com/ , but the website is down at the moment. I hope it will be back again soon. When the website is back again, you can find its e-mail to contact people at the Foundation and ask them how to buy these DVDs from overseas.

Another Thai vcd which is really worth having is TONGPAN (1977). You can read the details about this film and how to order it, together with a bilingual book, from Thaicinema.org
http://www.thaicinema.org/news&scoops49_15tongpan.asp#etong

However, if you have any problems ordering these Thai dvd/vcds from overseas, you can e-mail me at bearania@yahoo.com to give me your address. I think I can buy them and send them to your address for free from time to time, maybe once every two months. 🙂

I don’t know much about the Thai vcd market here. I think there might be some other classic Thai films released as vcds, but most of them have no English subtitles.

I once wrote a short comment on my favorite old Thai films in February. I think I should post it again.
http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/02/lives-of-others.html

Copy from an e-mail I sent to someone

Below is the list of old Thai films that I like:

1.MUANG NAI MORK (A TOWN SHROUDED IN FOG) (1978, PEOMPOL CHEYARUN)

This film is about a family who run a hotel in the far north of Thailand. They kill many guests of the hotel to steal the guests’ money. Unfortunately, one of the guests they kill is their own long-lost son. The film is inspired by a writing of Albert Camus.

2.PRASART (INSANE) (1975, PIAK POSTER)

This film is about the lives of three women. One of them is obviously abnormal. The other two might be secretly insane.

3.CHUAA FAA DIN SALAI (FOREVER YOURS) (1955, MARUT)

A romantic tragedy story about a married woman and her handsome lover who are chained together.

4.TONGPAN (1977)

The film is about a controversial dam project and its devastating effects on the poor.

5.GARM (SEX) (1978, CHATRICHALERM YUKOL)

The film is about a girl who gets involved with a male artist who likes to draw vagina.

I think Muang Nai Mork and Prasart haven’t been released as vcds yet.

I have heard that half of all Thai films ever made have been lost forever. It’s very sad.

————————————————-

Below is a photo of Mario Maurer, the leading actor of LOVE OF SIAM, a new Thai film by Chookiat Sakvirakul.

May 27, 2007

ROYAL S. BROWN INTERVIEWS ALAIN ROBBE-GRILLET

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 1:12 am

If there is one thing missing in the DVD of LA BELLE CAPTIVE (1983, Alain Robbe-Grillet, A+), it might be a commentary on the film. And if Robbe-Grillet is not willing to comment on the film himself, I hope Royal S. Brown can comment on the film. I don’t know much about Royal S. Brown, but I guess he is an expert on Robbe-Grillet. My friend gave me two articles by Royal S. Brown to read, and they stun me.

The first article is SERIALISM IN ROBBE-GRILLET’S EDEN AND AFTER: THE NARRATIVE AND ITS DOUBLES. In this article, Royal S. Brown analyzes EDEN AND AFTER (1970, Alain Robbe-Grillet, A+) thoroughly and makes a fascinating table to show that EDEN AND AFTER has 12 motifs, and these 12 motifs occur repeatedly as series for at least six times in the film. The twelve motifs are IMAGINATION, PRISON, MALE SEXUAL ORGAN, SPERM, BLOOD, DOORS, LABYRINTH, DOUBLE, WATER, DEATH, DANCE, and PAINTING. For example, the motif MALE SEXUAL ORGAN occurs first in the title sequence as a text “sexual violence”, the second time it was represented as a gang rape scene, the third time it was shown as the key in a bizarre game which leads the heroine towards a revolver, the fourth time it was shown as chains & whips which tied Marie-Eve, the fifth time it was shown as tableu of tortures in which women are chained to wheels or to spiked grilles, and the sixth time it was shown as the torture of the heroine by using scorpions.

I don’t know which magazine or which book these articles came from. But if you see any books or any magazines with the writing of Royal S. Brown, I suggest you grab it.

The second article I have is a conversation between Alain Robbe-Grillet and Royal S. Brown. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I read this conversation. My jaw dropped. I was shocked to learn from this interview that almost all the interior scenes in LA BELLE CAPTIVE were shot in the same house. If I didn’t read this interview, I would think that the film’s interior scenes were shot in 5-6 different places. I feel as if I had just seen THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE (1977, Luis Bunuel) and just knew later that there were two actresses playing the same role in the film.

Below is some fragments from the conversation between Alain Robbe-Grillet and Royal S. Brown:

“Robbe-Grillet: …I liked this villa right away. And it’s as of the moment that I had that villa in my hands that the film took its shape. I visited the villa with my cinematographer, Henri Alekan, and we immediately imagined things for this villa. And I decided to shoot the entire film in the villa. In other words, the film takes its place either entirely in someone’s mind or else in diverse settings—a nightclub, a clinic, etc. Since it takes place entirely in someone’s mind, everything takes place in the same setting. We modified the bedrooms from one day to the next. You’ll remember that there’s a completely black nighttclub and a completely white clinic: well, it’s the same room! The house was used to such a degree, in fact, that even the motorcycle and the car, which seem to be moving outside in the night, were brought inside the house so that we could light them the way we wanted, and so forth.”

“…On the other hand, Henri de Corinthe’s house, a house that is supposed to be in another place—and the exterior is, in fact, a different house, also in Saint Cloud—as soon as one enters it, it’s the Villa Gounod. And the house of Van de Reeves, the old professor, is once again the interior of the Villa Gounod, and quite often the same rooms! The underground passage through which you get into the clinic is in the basement of the Villa Gounod, the clinic where one arrives is the Villa Gounod, everything! And I like that, because of this kind of dream-like unity within the entire setting, except for the cafe, which almost seems for me to be in another film. There’s almost always a scene that seems to belong to another film.”

————————————————————–

Below is a painting called SUSPENSION OF MERIT by Rafal Olbinski.
http://www.patinae.com/paint2.htm


 

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