Limitless Cinema in Broken English

June 30, 2007

FAVORITE QUOTE FROM “COUP POUR COUP”

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 10:13 am

I just watched COUP POUR COUP (BLOW FOR BLOW) (1972, Marin Karmitz, A+) from a videotape. I like it very much. One thing that I love in this film about striking female workers is the use of sound and soundtrack. The toxic sound in a factory in this film is very unbearable. I wonder what the sound of this film would be like if I saw this film in a theatre. It would be very loud and could assault the ears of the viewers very forcefully. The soundtrack of this film is also very good. It makes the film more exciting. The soundtrack of this film somehow gives me the same excitement that I have when I watch a thriller.

There is a female voiceover in COUP POUR COUP. I like what she said to the evil factory boss very much, so I quote it here:

“You thought that we were only women
But you were forced to give in.
Agnes and Colette will stay with us.
Things will be different now. We will have a say.
Your foremen aren’t so arrogant. And for good reason!
No more of your secret negotiations.
You’ll have to accept what we impose.
We know you haven’t swallowed your sequestration.
We know you’ll try to fire workers.
You and your press cried scandal.
YOU CALLED ON THE LAW. BUT YOUR LAW IS TO SEQUESTRATE WORKERS FROM THE MOMENT THEY ARE HIRED UNTIL THE END OF THE TUNNEL, WHERE THE CHRYSANTHEMUMS GROW.
OUR LAW IS JUSTICE FOR THE PEOPLE.
IT’S A KNIFE TO YOUR THROAT.
You’ll try to eliminate what you call the troublemakers.
Don’t forget that your great victory is the unity we forged with our own strength.
Unity with our husbands, who are now aware of our struggle.
Unity with other factories.
OUR FIGHT HAS SPREAD. AND MAYBE, ONE DAY, IT WILL END IN BLOODSHED.
DON’T FORGET, THE IMPORTANT THING IS NOT YOUR MEASURES.
THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS WHAT HAS CHANGED IN OUR MINDS.
WE HAVE TAKEN THE RIGHT TO SPEAK, TO TAKE ACTION.
RIGHTS THAT YOU BOSSES HAVE DENIED US, TO MAKE US MORE SUBSERVIENT.
AND WE SHALL FIGHT FOR THOSE RIGHTS WITH VIOLENCE, TO CONQUER THEM, TO KEEP THEM UNTIL THE DAY YOU DON’T HAVE ANY MORE.

*

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*

After seeing COUP POUR COUP, I think I would like to see some more films about laborers, especially the German films directed by Christian Ziewer. I have never seen any films by Christian Ziewer. I wish someone organized a Christian Ziewer retrospective in Bangkok soon.

Some information about films directed by Christian Ziewer from New York Times website:
http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=229412

1.DEAR MOTHER, I’M ALL RIGHT (1971)

“This German docudrama explores the ins and outs of a strike in a West Berlin factory. The story concerns a locksmith who, on the recommendation of his employment agency, comes to Berlin to interview for a job in the factory. The job has nothing to do with locksmithery; however, it is in the transport section. As a result, he is in an even testier mood than his disgruntled co-workers, and when the strike is near to being settled he wants it to continue. ~ Clarke Fountain, All Movie Guide”

2.SNOWDROPS BLOOM IN SEPTEMBER (1976)

“In this combination documentary/drama, the domestic lives of two factory workers are fictionalized within a documentary treatment of events on the job during a wage dispute in early ’70s West Germany. ~ Clarke Fountain, All Movie Guide”

3.WALKING UPRIGHT (1976)

“Dieter Wittowski (Claus Eberth) is a factory worker who is suddenly put out of work by a strike. When he gives a newspaper interview to a reporter and makes comments supporting his co-workers, his words are edited out of shape into a form which seems to place the issue into a native-Germans versus guest-workers context. When he tries to correct things, he finds that this distortion by the newspaper accurately reflects the views of his family and co-workers, who considered him a sort of hero for saying those things. When the strike fails, he is left with an issue of conscience about whether to return to the job. ~ Clarke Fountain, All Movie Guide”

4.SEE THIS LAND FROM AFAR (1978)

“A family of Chilean socialists living in West Germany, refugees from the coup which toppled Salvador Allende, attempt to survive on the few jobs which are open to them. In the story, the father has just been fired from his job because of his politically unreliable, i.e., socialist, background. The son of the family comes to the rescue by taking a job as a stockroom boy. His father strives mightily to get his job back, so that the boy can remain in school. In the meantime, the boy has made friends with a Greek socialist refugee and has found a German girlfriend. ~ Clarke Fountain, All Movie Guide”

5.THE DEATH OF THE WHITE SEED (1985)

“This somewhat superficial historical drama is about the 1525 Peasants’ War in Germany when the lower classes rebelled against oppressive conditions imposed by the clergy and nobility and then committed many acts (including atrocities) that did not morally set them far apart from the people they were fighting. It was a time of upheaval: Martin Luther (1483-1556) had broken away from the Catholic Church, calling for reform, and Anabaptists in Germany, like Thomas Munzer fought on the side of the peasants (opposed by Luther). This complex age and its political and religious turmoil are summed up in a story about an attack on a small monastery whose monks used a forged document to confiscate some land from the peasants. When their wrong-doing is revealed by the monk who forged the document in the first place, the peasants attack. While the peasants wait for the heralded arrival of their warrior-savior on a white horse to bring justice to their cause, their fortunes go from bad to worse as the nobility gear up for revenge. This epic story might have been better served if director Christian Ziewer‘s budget had not been cut, forcing economic measures that have an effect on both depth and continuity. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, All Movie Guide”

This is an image from the DVD of DEAR MOTHER, I’M ALL RIGHT
http://www.basisdvd.de/filme/01_liebe_mutter/liebe_mutter.html

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HANS BALDUNG GRIEN

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 9:30 am

MY COMMENT IN MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE’S BLOG:
http://memoriesofthefuture.wordpress.com/2007/06/09/reflections/

Some trivia for you:

1. In the book VARDA PAR AGNES (1994), Varda said that the conception of CLEO FROM 5 TO 7 was influenced by the painting DEATH AND THE MAIDEN by Hans Baldung Grien. I have searched for this painting on the internet, and found that there might be 3-4 paintings by Baldung Grien sharing the same title. I don’t know which one influenced Varda, or maybe the whole DEATH AND THE MAIDEN series of paintings influenced her.


2. CLEO FROM 5 TO 7 (1961) is indirectly referenced in MY LIFE TO LIVE (1962, Jean-Luc Godard), because in MY LIFE TO LIVE, Nana (Anna Karina) said proudly that she once appeared in a film with Eddie Constantine. And both Anna Karina and Eddie Constantine appeared in CLEO FROM 5 TO 7. (I got to know this trivia from the book GODARD ON GODARD.)

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SOME PAINTINGS BY HANS BALDUNG GRIEN (1484-1545)

1.THREE AGES OF THE WOMAN AND THE DEATH (1509-1510)
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/baldung/ages/

2.DEATH AND THE MAIDEN (1517)
http://www.lamortdanslart.com/fille/maiden.htm

3.DEATH AND THE MAIDEN (1518-1520)
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/b/baldung/1/061death.html

ALEKSEI MURADOV

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 8:36 am

My comment in Pasha Pavlyuts’ list in YMDB
http://www.shompy.com/beatpaul/l42574.html

I don’t have English subs for INDIA SONG. I watched this film when it was shown in a theatre at Alliance Francaise in Bangkok. The film I watched at that time had English subtitles.

If you have a chance to see INDIA SONG without English subtitles and wonder what the voiceover is all about, maybe you can search for the book INDIA SONG, written by Marguerite Duras, in some libraries or bookstores. I have read this book, which is a play, and find that what is said in the play is 60-70 % similar to what is said in the movie.

By the way, I’m glad to see IN MY SKIN (2002, Marina de Van) in your list. Taking a look at your list, I think you might like some poetic gloomy films. Have you seen any films by Aleksei Muradov? I have seen THE KITE (2002) and like it a lot. I think THE KITE might go well with Bela Tarr and Sharunas Bartas. Another gloomy film which I like very much is SOMBRE (1998, Philippe Grandrieux), which has been released as a DVD.

A photo from THE KITE (2002, Aleksei Muradov, A+)
http://www.cinema.bg/sff/2003/eng/movie.php?movieSid=16

June 28, 2007

FILMS ABOUT STILL PHOTOS

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 6:50 pm

This post is related to:
http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/06/alain-jaubert-will-come-to-bangkok.html
http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2007/06/ten-thai-photo-resembling-films.html

The first time I heard the name ALAIN JAUBERT is when I got a free copy of a book called MARGES DE LA PHOTO from Alliance Francaise in Bangkok a few years ago. This free book is marvelous. It has a lot of information about

1.Films about still photos

2.Photo-resembling films

I learned from this book that Alain Jaubert directed some very interesting short films. I have never seen his films, but I hope I have a chance to see them in the future (though I can’t attend his film event in Bangkok this early July.)

MARGES DE LA PHOTO is a book and a film program made by Raymond Bellour, Anne Coutinot, and Sylvain Roumette.

Films listed in this book

A. INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE HISTORY

1.INTERIEURS (1982, Gilles Delavaud)

2. RAPHO, HISTOIRE D’UNE FAMILLE (1987, Frederic Mitterand, Patrick Jeudy)

3. LA MEMOIRE EN CHANTANT: LES ANNEES 40 (1988, Patrick Barberis)

4. UNE GENERATION (1982, Philippe Grandrieux)

5. RECITS D’ELLIS ISLAND TRACES (1980, Robert Bober + Georges Perec)

6. AUSCHWITZ L’ALBUM LA MEMOIRE (1984, Alain Jaubert)

B.THE “I” AND THE FAMILY ALBUM

7. MARINE TERRACE (1988, Michel Pamart)

8. EXTRAITS DU JOURNAL DE JACQUES-HENRI LATIGUE (1974, Claude Ventura)

9. LES ANNEES DECLIC 1957-1977 (1984, Raymond Depardon + Roger Ikhlef)

C.IDENTITIES

10. KARINE (1976, Robert Cahen)

11. LA FLECHE DU TEMPS (1982, Alain Jaubert)

12. CINEMATON (1978, Gerard Courant)

13. 36 976 PORTRAITS (1982, Claus Holtz + Hartmut Lerch)

14. LA PETITE CLASSE DE MONSIEUR BERTILLON (1982, Gilles Delavaud)

15. LES CARABINIERS (REVISITES) (1987, Pierre-Oscar Levy)

D.BETWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AND PAINTING

16. FILMS SUR HANS BELLMER (1972, Catherine Binet)

17. LE PROCEDE FRESSON (1987, Jean Real)
In this film, the photographers John Batho, Frank Horvat, Georges Tourdjman and Bernard Faucon talk about the printing process they prefer: the Fresson process.

18. GEORGES ROUSSE (1985, Christophe Loizillon)

19. PANOPLIE (1978, Philippe Gaucherand)

20. JEAN LE GAC ET LE PEINTRE L (1983, Michel Pamart)

21. CHRISTIAN BOLTANSKI (1989, Alain Fleischer)

22. DETAILS ROMAN OPALKA (1987, Christophe Loizillon)

E.STILLNESS/MOVEMENT

23. CARTES POSTALES VIDEO (1986, Robert Cahen + Stephane Huter + Alain Longuet)

24. FILMING MUYBRIDGE (1981, Jean-Louis Gonnet)

25. CONTACTS: WILLIAM KLEIN (1988-1989, William Klein)

26. CONTACTS: ROBERT DOISNEAU (1988-1989, Sylvain Roumette)

27. QUATRE MINUTES QUARANTE-NEUF DE GENERATIONS D’IMAGES (1987, Denis Rousseau-Kaplan)

28. MARDI GRAS (1979, Elizabeth Lennard)

29. NEWS FROM HOME (1976, Chantal Akerman, A+)

30. LETTRE A FREDDY BUACHE (1982, Jean-Luc Godard)

31. COLLOQUE DE CHIENS (1977, Raoul Ruiz)

32. LA JETEE (1963, Chris Marker)

F.VISIBLE, INVISIBLE

33. UNE MINUTE POUR UNE IMAGE (1984, Agnes Varda)

34. LES PHOTOS D’ALIX (1980, Jean Eustache)

35. L’HORREUR DE LA LUMIERE (1982, Jean-Andre Fieschi + Georges Didi-Huberman)

36. ICI ET AILLEURS (1974, Jean-Luc Godard + Anne-Marie Mieville)
37. ULYSSE (1982, Agnes Varda)

38. LA DISPARITION (1982, Alain Jaubert)

39. TROIS HISTOIRES DE CHINE (1981, Alain Jaubert)

40. LE SPHINX (1986, Thierry Knauff)
With text from QUATRE HEURES A CHATILA by Jean Genet

–Of all the 40 films listed above, the one I’d like to see the most is UNE GENERATION (1982, Philippe Grandrieux, 11:30 minutes). I think this Grandrieux should be the same person who directed SOMBRE (1998, A+), though I’m not 100 % sure about this.

MARGES DE LA PHOTO gives a little information about UNE GENERATION. It said, “The PALUCHE and the polaroid to present a generation who has not lived through 68 and for whom the tenth of May has been the first political change. The film discloses snatches of its argument, fragments of pictures, newspaper and television, the impossible choices and the questioning of beliefs.”

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MY FAVORITE FILM ABOUT PHOTO

TERMINAL BAR (2003, Stefan Nadelman, A)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0344437/

MY FAVORITE PHOTO-RESEMBLING FILM

SUBURBS OF EMPTINESS (2003, Thomas Koener, A+)
http://www.koener.de/bdv.html

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This is the photo 13eme CHAMBRE D’AMOUR by Bernard Faucon
http://www.bernardfaucon.net/photos/index.htm

FAVORITE TURKISH FILMS

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 5:55 pm

 RECENTLY CELINEJULIE HAS COMMENTED IN NEW SCREENOUT WEBBOARD:
http://www.xq28.net/wow/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=192&start=100

 

FAVORITE TURKISH FILMS

1.FOTOGRAF (2001, Kazim Oz, A+)

2.ANGEL’S FALL (2005, Semih Kaplanoglu, A+)

3.MOTHERLAND HOTEL (1987, Omer Kavur, A+)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092558/

4.INNOCENCE (1997, Zeki Demirkubuz, A+)

5.WAITING FOR THE CLOUDS (2004, Yesim Ustaoglu, A+)

Below is a photo from INNOCENCE (1997, Zeki Demirkubuz, A+)

http://www.demirkubuz.com/

KONG RITHDEE: BEWARE THE WATCHDOGS OF CINEMA

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 5:00 pm

–Recommended English website about Thailand

Prachatai News
http://www.prachatai.com/english/

–Recommended Film Program in Bangkok (in Thai)
http://www.onopen.com/2007/editor-spaces/1936

–Recommended Article

BEWARE THE WATCHDOGS OF CINEMA

This article was written by Kong Rithdee in Bangkok Post newspaper on Saturday, June 23, 2007
http://www.bangkokpost.com/230607_News/23Jun2007_news20.php

This is not 1984, but the Thought Police continue to grind their teeth and tighten their grip with manic paranoia. Buoyed by the heaving waves of new conservatism, the Big Sisters at our Ministry of unCulture are pushing a new Film Act that promises a weird rating system that will zap us back to the Dark Ages, if not into a black hole.

Now in the pipeline to be tabled before Cabinet and subsequently to the National Legislative Assembly, the draft of the new film law, written by the Council of State under the guidance of the hawks at the unCulture Ministry, proposes a system unseen before in the history of film rating (bar Communist states). As written, there will be the G rating, given to a movie suitable for all age groups; the over-15 rating, the over-18, and here’s the kick: the “Banned” rating. Hidden like a dagger in a cloak is another clause that gives legal right to the film committees, which will be made up mainly of bureaucrats, to axe “inappropriate scenes”. They just adore their scissors, these self-appointed dogs – I mean watchdogs – and with the tenacity of a rottweiler biting into the arm of a suspect murderer, they’ll do everything to cling on to their power to cut, hack, bite, butcher, amputate, mutilate and maim. In short, there will be both the rating and the cut. This proposed legislation is not in the least an improvement to the antiquated, pre-constitutional monarchy 1930 Film Act that is still being enforced today. Seventy-seven years of trying to catch up with reality, and still we fail miserably. It’s not just disappointing, it’s utterly sad.

In a sensible world, to apply the film rating and age classification means to do away with the cuts and the ban. The system works like a swimming pool with different depth levels; kids can go in at the shallow end and not the other, but there must be a deeper end into which adults can take a plunge. Only halfwits would build a swimming pool with only the shallow side and ban anything deeper, absurdly claiming that it is “dangerous” and “inappropriate”. The people who’ve written the new film law clearly want us all to keep swimming in the kid’s pool, splashing about in waist-deep water like dying beached whales, and thus dwarfing our ability to grow and seek challenges down the deeper slope.

True, it is naive to believe that the rating system is faultless, but in many countries it has proved an adequately foolproof means for the state to allow artistic freedom while retaining certain measures of control.

To advocate the No-Cut!-No-Ban! stance may sound extreme to concerned parties – what if they start making kiddie porn, what if the movies start mocking Muslims, or Sikhs or Hindus or Buddhists, what if…? Those who’ve raised these knee-jerk What Ifs fail to acknowledge that these offences have already been covered by other legislation, like the anti-obscenity or lese majeste laws, and that the spirit of the film act should be to encourage freedom of expression instead of crushing it.

Besides, if I wanted to make porn, I would never in my full sanity submit it to the rating committee – I would rather sell it underground (or above, in dusty corners of crummy department stores) as porn peddlers are doing it today, this minute, right now, pronto!

Harbouring a chronic, laughable mistrust against modern art, the Ministry of unCulture only flaunts the movie rating system as a subterfuge to defuse the growing anxiety of professionals and the public who are weary of fascistic censorship, but in their heart of hearts the state does not want to relinquish their god-like power to tell us what we can see. Their moralistic posturing and insistent claims that they are doing this to protect youngsters can be hardly justified, since every day we still see brain-damaging stuff on television, not to mention other media that openly plug obscure materials – like those 1-900 lines with pictures of red-lipped women – without raising any objection from those cultured people in traditional Thai dresses.

Last week the Thai Directors’ Association and Thai Film Foundation submitted a petition to Cabinet to reconsider the law, particularly the heated issues of cutting and banning. In our attempt to update the 77-year-old Film Act, will we end up with a new law even more antiquated in mentality? Replacing something bad with what is worse would be the sickest joke of the year.

Kong Rithdee writes about movies and popular culture in the real.time section of the Bangkok Post.

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Below is a poster of an anti-coup campaign in Thailand. The poster comes from http://www.onopen.com/ . This poster somehow reminds me of a French animation film called IMPRINT (1975, Jacques Cardon, A+)

June 27, 2007

ALAIN JAUBERT WILL COME TO BANGKOK

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 6:58 pm

Below is the program of ART FILM DAY at the Alliance française of Bangkok Saturday 7 July. I can’t attend this event, because I am scheduled to work in my office that day. I feel so sad.

4 hrs : Screening of short programmes of 2 mn each :

Programme « D’art d’art » : a work of art is presented and depicted in 2 mn by the TV presenter. This show resorts to animation and special effects which makes it very original and entertaining. The following works of art will be presented :

« Etudes de ciel », Eugène Delacroix

« The Turkish bath », Jean-Auguste Dominique Ingres, (1862-1863)

« Dancing at Moulin Rouge », Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1890)

« The Fountain », Marcel Duchamp (1974/1964)

« The Dauphine », César (1959)

« Monochrom IKB 3, Yves Klein (1960)

« Closerie Falbala », Jean Dubuffet (1971-1973)

Programme « Suivez l’artiste » (« Follow the artist ») : A French artist gives his feelings in front of a work of art at the Centre Georges Pompidou, the Museum of Modern Art of Paris.

« Carry Bottles » (1914-1964) by Marcel Duchamp with Pierre Bergé

« Roger and his son » (1936) by Balthus with Pierre Arditi

« Ride with the setting sun » (1936) by Georges Rouault with Daniel Picouly

« Le Métafisyx » (1950) by Jean Dubuffet with Alain Corneau

« Anthropometry of the blue time (ANT 82) » (1960) by Yves Klein with Agnès
Varda

« Compression « Ricard » » (1962) by César with Jean Nouvel

14 hrs 30 : Presentation by Mr Alain Jaubert, French director and producer of programmes about art

Mr Jaubert will talk about the way films on art are produced in France and about his own experience as author and director of « Palettes », one of the most famous television programme about art in France. « Palettes » is a programme of art popularization focused on paintings. It was created by Alain Jaubert more than 10 years ago and it is still screened on French television. Every programme deals with one work of art and unveils its secrets : the material and the paint brush used, the historical context surrounding the painting, the characters, etc. The programme reveals to the larger public elements usually reserved to the specialists of history of art.

15 hrs15 : Screening of the programme « Palettes » (26 mn) – « 4 seasons » by Nicolas Poussin (1660-1664)

15 hrs 45 : Presentation by Dr Sayan Daengklom, Professor of History of Art and art critics, specialist of Nicolas Poussin

16 hrs 10 : Coffee Break

16 hrs 30 : Panel discussion with Mr Jaubert, Dr Sayan Daengklom, and Brian Mertens, art critic, as moderator

Questions tackled :

What is the role of media such as television in the diffusion of knowledge and
more particularly of art ?

What are the difficulties and the limits of such a process ?

17 hrs 30 : Refreshments served

Information and Booking (before July 3rd) :
Mr Alongkorn THAUBOL / Tel : 02 627 21 06 / Alongkorn.THAUBOL@diplomatie.gouv.fr

Miss Géraldine Durand / Tel : 02 627 21 05 / Fax : 02 627 21 11 /
geraldine.durand@diplomatie.gouv.fr

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Below is UNTITLED FIRE PAINTING (1961) by Yves Klein
http://www.diacenter.org/kos/images/klein.html

I’M ASHAMED OF MY FALSE MEMORY

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 6:32 pm

I apologize to those who have read my blog. Today I have made some corrections concerning my mentioning about THE BIRTH OF LOVE (1993, Philippe Garrel, A+). I wrote last week that some similar things between LE COEUR FANTOME and THE BIRTH OF LOVE include a story involving painting.

Today I deleted that sentence. Because I just realized a few minutes ago that I had been confused between THE BIRTH OF LOVE and LATE AUGUST, EARLY SEPTEMBER (1998, Olivier Assayas, A-). There is something concerning a painting in LATE AUGUST, EARLY SEPTEMBER, but I don’t think it is in THE BIRTH OF LOVE.

If I don’t remember it wrongly, in LATE AUGUST, EARLY SEPTEMBER, the character played by Mia Hansen-Love had something to do with a painting. But last week I thought that character was in THE BIRTH OF LOVE. I was wrong.

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My favorite scene in HAPPY ENDINGS is the one scene when Lisa Kudrow met Maggie Gyllenhaal. That scene is not so important for the storyline, I think. But I am always thrilled when I see a scene like that: a scene in which two interesting (or bitchy) female characters meet or confront each other.

Apart from that scene in HAPPY ENDINGS, other scenes which thrilled me in the same way include:

1.In THE BLACK DAHLIA (2006, Brian De Palma, A+/A), there is a scene when Hilary Swank looked out of a window and saw Scarlett Johansson. Both women seemed to hate each other. And I felt the adrenaline rush watching this scene.

2.In THE COLOR OF LIES (1999, Claude Chabrol), I felt the most excited when I saw Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi tried to investigate Sandrine Bonnaire while the latter was ironing some clothes.

There is a film which I like very much for the same reason. That film is PRAYING MANTIS (1982, Jack Gold, A+). In this film, two femme fatales (Cherie Lunghi and Carmen du Sautoy) tried to outwit each other. Classic!

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Below is a photo from ETOILE VIOLETTE (2005, Axelle Ropert), starring Lou Castel. He is also the main actor in THE BIRTH OF LOVE. The photo comes from http://www.allocine.fr/


 

“THERE ARE NO ANSWERS IN LIFE.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 12:16 am

I went to see HAPPY ENDINGS (2005, Don Roos, A) on Saturday. I like it very much. There are many things in the film which are unpredictable for me. However, after the film ended, I think the film is too “calculated”. (I don’t know if I use the right English word.)

The feeling that the film is too calculated made me analyze my feeling further. I think that in the past I didn’t mind so much if any film was too calculated or not. Some of my friends hate films such as AMERICAN BEAUTY and LA CLASSE DE NEIGE (1998, Claude Miller, A+), accusing them as too calculated. But I love AMERICAN BEAUTY and LA CLASSE DE NEIGE.

Why I seemed to mind that HAPPY ENDINGS is too calculated, and gave it A instead of A+. What made me feel like that?

I came to a conclusion that my feeling might not be the result of anything in HAPPY ENDINGS, but the real cause of my feeling is the fact that I watched LE COEUR FANTOME (1996, Philippe Garrel, A+) about a week ago. After watching this masterpiece (in my point of view), it seems as if every film by other directors looks too calculated for me.

At first I feel reluctant about whether I should blame it on Philippe Garrel or not. But after I re-read an article on Garrel by Maximilian Le Cain in Sense of Cinema, I think I should really blame it on Philippe Garrel, not on Don Roos.

The following paragraph is written by Maximilian Le Cain:
http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/01/12/garrel.html

“Garrel’s films are made up of moments, moments of day-to-day intimacy or alienation, often elliptically linked. Quiet conversations and silences between friends and lovers. And thought. Few other directors have made reflection so central to their filmmaking and almost none have captured it with such unforced grace. It is a cinema of contemplation rather than narrative. He shoots with the most basic means in an elegant, portrait like style. Sometimes he uses quite long takes, always with very little cutting around in a scene and often none at all. Scenes are filmed with a stillness and a patience that do the exact opposite of what most effective narrative cinema does, that is, to grab audiences and manipulate them into a state of false emotion.”

I have seen only two films by Philippe Garrel: THE BIRTH OF LOVE and LE COEUR FANTOME, but I think I really worship him now.

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There is another scene that I like very much in LE COEUR FANTOME. It is an early scene when a mother (Veronique Silver) is talking to her son (Luis Rego). I like the conversation in this scene very much. So I quote it here:

MY FAVORITE MOVIE QUOTE FROM “LE COEUR FANTOME”:

Son: Why do you ask? Thinking about dad?

Mum: No. No. It’s just if you feel like that…

Son: I’ll end up like dad?

Mum: No…But things would be easier between you and Annie.

Son: It wouldn’t change anything.

Mum: It would! I’M NOT ALWAYS THINKING OF YOUR DAD. WE’VE BEEN SEPARATED 30 YEARS.

Son: That doesn’t mean anything.

Mum: Yes, it does. Things are simpler than you think.

Son: Things are simple as long as the kids come first.

Mum: I’m glad you think like that. BUT KIDS AREN’T A CURE-ALL. TAKE ME AND YOUR DAD. WE HAD THREE.

Son: Why did you split up?

Mum walks away, thinking for a while, then says: I’d give you one version, your dad, another. No one would be any the wiser.

Son: What’s your version?

Mum: THERE ARE NO ANSWERS IN LIFE. ONLY SOLUTIONS AND DECISIONS. ANSWERS ARE ONLY IN STORIES.

Son: Say I’m writing a story about you and dad, and I need your point of view.

Mum: YOU CAN SAY WE THOUGHT WE WERE MADE FOR EACH OTHER, AND THEN WE REALISED WE WERE WRONG.

–This conversation scene is now one of my most favorite scenes in this year.

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–Talking about films which show “moments of day-to-day” activities, another film which I like very much is a short film called SUN IN WINTER (DU SOLEIL EN HIVER) (2005, Samuel Collardey, A+).

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Below are some photos from LE COEUR FANTOME. I shot these photos from my TV by using my cheap mobile phone. The film is in color, but when I pressed the pause button on the video player, the picture on the screen lost the colors. These photos are very bad taken by me, I know.

VERONIQUE SILVER AS THE MOTHER:

 
VALERIA BRUNI TEDESCHI AS THE WHORE:

EVELYNE DIDI AS THE WIFE

JOHANNA TER STEEGE AS THE HEROIN ADDICT

June 24, 2007

PARIS HILTON FROM DUSK TILL DAWN

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 5:24 pm

RECENTLY CELINEJULIE HAS COMMENTED IN:

–MICHAEL GUILLEN’S BLOG:
http://theeveningclass.blogspot.com/2007/06/2007-frameline31michael-hawleys-preview.html

Hi, Maya, I also like BIG BANG LOVE, JUVENILE A a lot. It is crazy. I don’t understand anything in it. As for Takashi Miike’s films, I have seen only six of them. This is the list in my preferential order:

1.MASTERS OF HORROR: IMPRINT (2006, A+)

2.ONE MISSED CALL (2003, A+)

I don’t think this film is better than AUDITION, but I like the (too many?) twists in the plot of this film.

3.AUDITION (1999, A)

4.BLUES HARP (1998, A-)
This film also has some homoerotic feelings in it.

5.THE BIRD PEOPLE IN CHINA (1998, A-)

6.THREE…EXTREMES: BOX (2004, A-/B+)

–I’m glad you like Maria de Medeiros. I also like her a lot. She also has an interesting supporting role in MY LIFE WITHOUT ME (2003, Isabel Coixet, A+) as a hairdresser who is obsessed with Milli Vanilli.

–I like Andre Techine a lot, but I feel the pace of CHANGING TIMES (2004, A) and LOIN (2001, A) are a little bit too fast for me to feel deeply involved in it.

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PARIS HILTON FROM DUSK TILL DAWN

I wrote this imaginary movie plot just for the fun of myself, but it would be good if any of you can enjoy it, too.

My writing below is inspired by many sources, including:

1.The movie games in LIKE ANNA KARINA’S SWEATER website
http://www.filmbrain.com/

2.An article about CLEO FROM 5 TO 7 in MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE blog, and the fact that Madonna was once to play the lead role in the remake of CLEO FROM 5 TO 7,
http://memoriesofthefuture.wordpress.com/2007/06/09/reflections/

3.A post in Matt Zoller Seitz’ blog about imaginary films
http://mattzollerseitz.blogspot.com/2007/01/5-for-day-wish-list_29.html

4.Reading about the film POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL (1965, Andy Warhol) in an article written by Graiwoot Chulphongsathorn in Bioscope Magazine (Thai)

5.AFTER HOURS (1985, Martin Scorsese)

–I wrote about some stupid imaginary films from time to time, but in Thai. This is the first time I wrote about it in details in English.

My stupid imaginary film this time is PARIS HILTON FROM DUSK TILL DAWN. It stars Paris Hilton. The film is twelve hour long and is divided into twelve parts; each part is an hour long and has three directors collaborating on it. So the whole film has 36 directors.

The film is in real time, similar to CLEO FROM 5 TO 7. The story of the film takes place from 18.00 hrs of one day to 06.00 hrs of the next day. The setting is in an anonymous town.

Below is the list of the 36 directors in roughly alphabetical order:

1.HERBERT ACHTERNBUSCH
2.KENNETH ANGER
3.ARTOUR ARISTAKISIAN
4.CHRISTOFFER BOE
5.CATHERINE BREILLAT
6.ISABEL COIXET
7.SOFIA COPPOLA
8.KHAVN DE LA CRUZ
9.CLAIRE DENIS
10.MARINA DE VAN
11.ATOM EGOYAN
12.ABEL FERRARA
13.PHILIPPE GRANDRIEUX
14.PETER GREENAWAY
15.WERNER HERZOG
16.ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY
17.MIRANDA JULY
18.ILYA KHRJANOVSKY
19.ALEXANDER KLUGE
20.BRUCE LA BRUCE
21.RICHARD LINKLATER
22.DAVID LYNCH
23.NOBUHIKO OBAYASHI
24.NAGISA OSHIMA
25.CHRISTIAN PETZOLD
26.ALAIN ROBBE-GRILLET
27.JOAO PEDRO RODRIGUES
28.NICOLAS ROEG
29.RAOUL RUIZ
30.WERNER SCHROETER
31.ALEXANDER SOKUROV
32.BELA TARR
33.SAM TAYLOR-WOOD
34.JONATHAN TEPLITZKY
35.MONIKA TREUT
36.ANDRZEJ ZULAWSKI

CAN YOU GUESS WHICH DIRECTORS SHOULD BELONG TO WHICH PART BELOW? EACH PART HAS THREE DIRECTORS. Or after reading this, do you have any suggestions or want to share your imagination?

PART 1: 18.00-19.00 HRS

Paris has sex with a cute boy. After that they talk together while the cute boy prances around the room wearing only an underwear.

PART 2: 19.00-20.00 HRS

Paris goes shopping for new shoes with her so-called friends (starring Victoria Beckham, Heidi Klum, Lindsay Lohan, Britney Spears, the Olsen twins), then they have dinner together. They talk while eating, but everybody is telling a lie. The Olsen twins talk about cloning, believing there is a cloning pair of them living somewhere. Then all of Paris’ friends start talking about the truth that they are all lesbians.

PART 3: 20.00-21.00 HRS

Paris and her friends dress up in fancy and outrageous clothes to go to a fancy opening party of a painting exhibition. The exhibition has 92 paintings, and has an unseen guide leading the viewers to travel through time and space while watching the paintings.

PART 4: 21.00-22.00 HRS

After traveling through time and space, Paris emerges out of the exhibition alone, losing her memory. She can’t remember who she is. She wanders the street and makes a new friend with a female criminal and a woman who claims to be her long-lost mother. The three of them meet a handsome serial killer who is a puppeteer and they try to escape from him. They ask for help from some cops, but the cops are corrupted.

PART 5: 22.00-23.00 HRS

They try to escape the serial killer by hiding in a hospital, but the hospital is invaded by an angry mob. They then take a refuge in a dilapidated house full of squatters and beggars. Paris accidentally kills a baby by sitting on top of the baby. Paris also notices a handsome poor guy sleeping on the floor, so she (and the camera) spends some twenty minutes watching that guy sleeping.

PART 6: 23.00-24.00 HRS

Paris and her friends are thrown out of the house after someone discovers the accidental death of the baby. They feel very hungry and search for leftover food on the streets. A family invites them to have food, but only gives them soil to eat. A woman they meet on the street suggests they become cannibals. They try it. Another woman (Marina de Van) suggests each one eats her own self. They try it too and enjoy it.

PART 7: 24.00-01.00 HRS

The eat-yourself woman has two sisters (Diamanda Galas and PJ Harvey). The three sisters take Paris and her new friends to see some stage shows: an opera, a circus freak show, and a music show in which the singers just lying still on the floor.

PART 8: 01.00-02.00 HRS

Paris and all her new friends wander the street at night and have some adventures involving a woman who acts madly (Isabelle Adjani), a group of anarchist dwarfs, and a handsome trash collector dressed like a catwoman.

PART 9: 02.00-03.00 HRS

Paris and her friends feel sleepy. They find an empty house and try to get some sleep in it, not knowing that the house is cursed and haunted. The house is haunted by the spirit of a woman who died while waiting for her boyfriend who went to fight in WWII. The spirit is in the piano, changing the piano into a human-eating machine. Marina de Van gets great pleasure while being eaten by the piano. The criminal girl (Sabine Timoteo) uses some martial arts to fight the spirit, but loses the fight and gets eaten. The house is also the living place of the mummy of Queen Hatshepsut, though this mummy actually wants to go back to a museum, because she forgot her handbag there. This part of the film is told from the viewpoint of a knee belonging to a German corporal who died in Stalingrad.

PART 10: 03.00-04.00 HRS

After fighting with the evil sprit and the mummy and listening to many things told by the knee, Paris starts regaining her memory. She also gets to possess the memory of her ancestors and the memory of other persons. This part of the film is told by using a lot of flashbacks.

PART 11: 04:00-05.00 HRS

Knowing who she is, Paris wanders the street alone with self-confidence. She meets a shoe salesman (John Hawkes) who walks along the street with her. They take a morning train and talk with a guy (Ethan Hawke). Later, they get out of the train together and talk to a guy in a laundrette (Mark Ruffalo). Parish loves all these three guys. She feels so romantic. Love is in the air.

PART 12: 05.00-06.00 HRS

Her romantic hope is interrupted when John Hawkes, Ethan Hawke and Mark Ruffalo go to have sex together. Paris comes back home, but no one in her house remembers her. Her so-called friends also deny knowing her. Paris isn’t sure whether:

1.She is dreaming.

2.Everyone is lying and takes part in a conspiracy.

3.She is dead a long time ago.

4.She is a character in a novel written by her friend.

5.She is a part of a tale told by a patient in an insane asylum.

6.She is living in a memory of an old woman.

The answer is in the comment box.

Below are the photos of the THREE SISTERS in PARIS HILTON FROM DUSK TILL DAWN.

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