Limitless Cinema in Broken English

February 10, 2009

FIREBALL (2009, Thanakorn Pongsuwan, A++++++++++)

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 9:54 pm

I like FIREBALL (TAR CHON) (2009, Thanakorn Pongsuwan, A++++++++++) very much, because it is full of many handsome actors, and because I think it is actually about some aspects of the so-called democratic system of Thailand after October 14, 1973. (If  I remember it correctly, a character said that the game Fireball was invented 35 years ago.) FIREBALL is now one of my most favorite political Thai films of all time, because I think I agree with some of its political viewpoints. FIREBALL reminds me of BUS LANE (2007, Kittikorn Leosirikun, A-), which is also an allegory about Thai politics, but I much prefer FIREBALL to BUS LANE.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3316/3268807281_a97187e8aa_o.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3507/3268826641_c228bb6c27_o.jpg


The actors in FIREBALL include:

1.Preeti Barameeanun
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3345/3269505292_41d514799f_o.jpg


2.Kasem Jesani
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3435/3269505300_a98a7c028a_o.jpg


3.Ratanabullung (or Arucha) Tosawasdi
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3514/3269505290_2785da068f_o.jpg


4.Anuwat SaeJao
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3418/3269505284_4327188ff0_o.jpg


5.Garnnut Samerjai
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3525/3269505296_3be859809e_o.jpg


6.Pootarit Prombundarn
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3346/3269505302_07ea5090f0_o.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3365/3269506560_135aeaf6c1_o.jpg


Pootarit also stars in BANGRAJUN (2000, Tanit Jitnukul, B )
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3419/3269506564_3672ebcd41_o.jpg

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3 Comments »

  1. This is my reply to Konmongnang in my bilingual blog:
    http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2009/02/fireball-2009-thanakorn-pongsuwan.html

    –Thank you very much for your comments, Konmongnang. This is very interesting.

    I hadn’t thought about “the Thai politics before 1973” before I read your comments. Your comment made me accept the fact that I may not understand the true meaning of this film at all. Maybe many things in FIREBALL have meanings which are beyond my understanding. However, though I may not understand the true meaning of this film, I would like to share with you my thoughts and my imagination after seeing this film.

    Firstly, I would like to clarify one of my approaches towards a film. When I see a film, I don’t care much if I understand it or not. Many film gives me the ultimate pleasure, though I don’t understand it, or though I even misunderstand it. What is important to me is the pleasure I get from a film, not my knowledge of the true meaning of a film.

    I get the ultimate pleasure from FIREBALL by watching its handsome actors, by watching its exciting scenes, by “thinking about the film”, and by “imagining many things inspired by the film”. Like many films I love, FIREBALL makes me accept the fact that what gives me the ultimate pleasure not only includes the original film itself, but also includes “another version of FIREBALL”. It’s the version which exists only in my imagination. I would like to call it “My Imagination Inspired By Fireball” or MIIBF here. It’s MIIBF which I would like to share with you. I accept the fact that MIIBF may be very different from FIREBALL, but I enjoy my imagination, and I don’t think it’s wrong to see a film and think about it and imagine another version of it and change it the way I like as long as I accept the fact that my imagination may not correspond to the true intentions of the filmmakers.

    –When I saw the character Den (Phutharit Prombundarn) in FIREBALL, there are some characteristics of Den which reminds me of a prime minister. I don’t know the true intention of the filmmakers. Maybe all these similarities between Den and that prime minister are accidental or unintentional. Anyway, it is fun to think about these unintentional similarities:

    1.Den is morally grey and is a new bourgeoise (as you already noticed).

    2.Den recruits some of his team members (politicians in his political party?) by choosing from talented members of other teams.

    3.The police seem to be after Den, but we don’t know even after the film ends if Den committed that crime or that murder or not. This thing unintentionally reminds me of a prime minister who is accused of many things—some of the accusations are true, some of them are unproved, and some of the most serious accusations are just unfounded rumours.

    4.Because of that accusation, Den said that he had to flee from Thailand. The only way which can help him stay in Thailand is that his team (political party?) must win the match (election?).

    Anyway, Den and that prime minister are a lot different from each other. But these characteristics of Den just accidentally remind me of that person.

    –The main reason why I much prefer FIREBALL to BUS LANE is its ending. The ending of FIREBALL unintentionally inspires my imagination very strongly, though I may not understand the true meanting of its ending at all. Anyway, I want to share with you about my imagination.

    While the ending of BUS LANE is “too peaceful” or “too happy” in my point of view, I think the ending of FIREBALL is full of anger. It’s the anger of the resurrected twin brother of the hero. I don’t understand at all what this brother wants to do next. He intends to get revenge. But I’m not sure whom he intends to kill next. Anyway, this ending with anger inspires my imagination a lot.

    In MIIBF, I imagine that this resurrected brother intends to get revenge on the system which controls the Fireball game. The Fireball game unintentionally reminds me of the so-called democratic system of Thailand. It is an “unfair” game, full of cheating, corrupted by illegal money (capitalism?), and the winning team may be allowed to do some illegal business more easily, but the winning team will not be the master of the country. The winning team, who may win either by cheating or by fighting fairly, must still obey and try to please the biggest mafia (the military?).

    In my imagination, the resurrected brother is angry, very angry. He will not play in the game any more. What he wants to do first is not to destroy the game (election) or the corruption in the game, but he may want to destroy the biggest mafia or the system which controls the game (totalitarianism which disguises itself as democracy). I like my imaginative ending very much. I know that the filmmakers may not intend anything like this at all. But that is not important to me. The original FIREBALL just inspires MIIBF in my head, and I get the ultimate pleasure from imagining that the resurrected brother will try to kill the biggest mafia after the film ends. The resurrected brother can’t stand this totalitarian system any more.

    –Another thing that I like in FIREBALL is the biggest mafia, who looks noble or elegant. It’s different from the character of Ton (Arucha Tosawasdi), who looks very villainous. Most villains in Thai films look very villainous like Ton, but I’m more interested in a “noble-looking villain” like this biggest mafia in FIREBALL, or like Sadok (Nirut Sirijanya) in OPAPATIKA (2007, Thanakorn Pongsuwan, B+ ), who can disguises himself as an innocent-looking woman and can “manipulate” many supernatural characters to come to help him destroying his enemy, until these supernatural characters are able to “see the truth” (this thing accidentally reminds me of the word “eye-cleansing”) that the beautiful woman is actually the old evil man who wants to be immortal (if I remember it correctly).

    –In the future, if the filmmakers of FIREBALL say that I misunderstand this film totally, I won’t like this film less. I truly enjoy my imagination inspired by this film, and that’s the most important thing for me.

    –Thank you very much for the information on Phutharit Prombundarn. I didn’t know that he also stars in Thai folklore TV series. Is he shirtless while playing in these TV series? Hahaha. I also just knew that Kasem Promdontree (เกษม พรหมดนตรี), a very muscular and handsome model, stars in a Thai folklore TV series called THE DAUGHTER OF MONKEY (ธิดาวานร). This information about handsome actors in folklore series makes me wish someone should make a gay folklore TV series in the future, so that these handsome actors can play in them and they can be scantily clad all the time like Thai men in the ancient times.

    –I wouldn’t have guessed that Kumpanat is that old. His body still looks great.

    –If I remember it correctly, I went to see FIREBALL at Paragon on Monday, February 2. The showtime was scheduled at 13.20. I went to buy the ticket at 13.30, because I knew that the advertisement would last about 30 minutes, but the ticket seller told me that the film showing had been cancelled because no one bought the ticket.

    So I went to see this film at Grand EGV Siam Discovery around 13.50. There were about ten people in that showing. However, I felt very sad that no one wanted to see this great film at Paragon.

    I was the only one audience when I went to see SMILING GANGSTER (HOD NA HIAW) (2009, Rerkchai Puangpetch, A+/A) at UMG RCA several weeks ago.

    Comment by celinejulie — February 12, 2009 @ 11:05 pm

  2. This is my reply to Konmongnang in my bilingual blog:
    http://celinejulie.blogspot.com/2009/02/fireball-2009-thanakorn-pongsuwan.html

    Thank you very much, Konmongnang, for your comments and interesting information.

    Yes, I think Wanchart Chunhasri is very charismatic. I didn’t remember him in THE SIAM RENAISSANCE. The thing I can remember the most about that film is that Rangsiroj Panpeng is very handsome. Hahaha.

    The playboy character in FIREBALL is named “K” (Anuwat SaeJao)

    I also think like you that the names of “Tai” and “Tan” are very interesting. Apart from reminding us about Tantai Prasertkul, these names also have interesting meanings of their own, because “Tai” means “freedom” and “Tan” can mean “representative”.

    If I remember it correctly, in the middle of the film, when the five good players race with each other in a crowded apartment to put the ball through the hoop, Ig is the winner of this game. Does this scene have special meaning? Can it mean that if this game is played fairly without violence, the winner will be the representative of the poorest or the needy? Hahaha.

    Like you, I am not sure if the revenge at the end of the film will lead to “anarchy” or “the end of totalitarianism”. I think the filmmakers don’t know, either. All of us have to wait and see what will happen in the near future in Thailand.

    The story about Kumpanat is interesting. That kind of rumor is very bad, because it is hard to prove or disprove it. Do you remember Spun Selakun, the famous model who became a rumor victim in 1980’s? I think Spun Selakun is more fortunate than Kumpanat in this aspect, because she could prove easily if she was HIV-infected or not.

    Talking about half-black half-Thai person reminds me of the TV series RICE OUTSIDE THE FARM (ข้าวนอกนา) (directed by Tapakorn Disayanun), which deals with the children left behind by those US soldiers in Vietnamese war. I used to read this novel by Seefar Ladawon when I was a little child. At that time, I thought the ending of this novel is quite unexpected for me, because the black heroine, who always wanted a “handsome” husband, did not get what she wanted at the end of the story. At first I thought this novel would have “a happy ending” like most Thai melodramatic novels, but this novel chooses to end “realistically” instead of “very happily”.

    This is the title of RICE OUTSIDE THE FARM

    Comment by celinejulie — February 16, 2009 @ 8:51 pm

  3. […] (2009) -dvdrip + English Sub – Today, 03:57 AM FIREBALL (2009, Thanakorn Pongsuwan, A++++++++++) Limitless Cinema in Broken EnglishTai, a young man arrested on a crime charge, is discharged thanks to his twin brother Tans dogged […]

    Pingback by Fireball (2009) -dvdrip + English Sub - Shared Warez | Rapidhsare Magaupload Downloads — May 7, 2009 @ 10:58 am


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