Limitless Cinema in Broken English

March 14, 2009

CUTE ACTOR: PRAJANPON WONGDONTREE

Filed under: Uncategorized — celinejulie @ 12:07 am

I don’t know if I am the only person who feels like this or not. In ANUENG KID TUENG PEN YANG YING (2009, Bhandit Rittakol, B+ ), I feel uncomfortable watching all the boys and girls playing pranks on the laborers. It’s not a harmless prank, but their pranks can cause serious damages on the laborers’ personal lives. And this film is not just a comedy in which we should not be serious too much about things happening. Since this film seems to make the viewers care for the boys and girls’ feelings for their school, why does the film ignore the laborers’ feelings?

I also have this kind of problem with BOONCHU 9 (2008, Bhandit Rittakol, B+/B). There’s a long fight scene in this film in which the hero’s group fight with the street kids/criminal gangs in order to save a criminal girl from being beaten up by this gang. This long fighting scene seems to make a lot of fun out of hurting these street kids. But I feel a little bit uncomfortable watching it. Somehow I wonder if it is fair or not that the film treats these street kids like this. Surely, we should fight these street kids to save the criminal girl, but does the film go too far? Is this the right attitude? Do these street kids get punished because they really did very bad things? Or do they get punished partly because they are just “supporting characters”, not “main characters” like the criminal girl? Or partly because they are not as beautiful as the criminal girl? Or partly because they are not as lucky as the criminal girl to become friend with the hero’s group?

The laborers and the street kids in these two films seem to be the opponents or the obstacles to the hero’s groups. But are these opponents also human beings? And they are opponents to the hero’s groups not because they are really bad persons, but just because they have to earn their living. Do the films present the right attitude towards these supporting characters?

If I remember it correctly, in ANUENG KID TUENG PEN YANG YING, the hero seems to say something which indicates that he does not understand the existence of homosexuality. Is this just an opinion of “a character”?

Anyway, I give this film B+, instead of B, because many actors in this film are cute, including:
http://www.nangdee.com/title/?movie_id=1835

Prajanpon Wongdontree
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3653/3351065053_da2b19c737_o.jpg


Pichet Pradubchananurat
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3583/3351065049_6965fca539_o.jpg


Tibadin Suntudkar
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3600/3351065057_c0b73e35a4_o.jpg

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1 Comment »

  1. This is my comment in WiseKwai’s blog:
    http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com/2009/03/dead-and-dying-single-screen-cinemas-of.html

    I also miss old theatres very much. This topic reminds me of a short Thai documentary called B-GRADE THEATRES (RONG NUNG SHUN SONG) (2005, Norachai Katchapanon, 12 minutes), in which the director interviews many people connected to a standalone theatre. It is sad to see that this kind of business can’t survive in the modern world. And I wonder how the standalone theatres’ employees earn their living now. From what I noticed, the ticket sellers in some standalone theatres in Bangkok were middle-aged women who had been working there for many decades. After all these standalone theatres shut down, how would they earn a living? You don’t develop many skills by being a ticket seller for 30 years. How would they find a new job? Where are they now? These questions bother my mind because I used to frequent a big theatre called Mackenna in Bangkok during 1984-1996, and saw the same old faces at its ticket booth during those years. You can also notice that the ticket sellers at Scala, Lido, and Siam have been working there for more than ten years, unlike those multiplexes which always use new faces. Anyway, I just hope all those old ticket sellers are happy somewhere now.

    Comment by celinejulie — March 14, 2009 @ 7:34 pm


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